pub struct NaiveDateTime { /* private fields */ }
Expand description

ISO 8601 combined date and time without timezone.

Example

NaiveDateTime is commonly created from NaiveDate.

use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 7, 8).and_hms(9, 10, 11);

You can use typical date-like and time-like methods, provided that relevant traits are in the scope.

use chrono::{Datelike, Timelike, Weekday};

assert_eq!(dt.weekday(), Weekday::Fri);
assert_eq!(dt.num_seconds_from_midnight(), 33011);

Implementations

Makes a new NaiveDateTime from date and time components. Equivalent to date.and_time(time) and many other helper constructors on NaiveDate.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveTime, NaiveDateTime};

let d = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 6, 3);
let t = NaiveTime::from_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);

let dt = NaiveDateTime::new(d, t);
assert_eq!(dt.date(), d);
assert_eq!(dt.time(), t);

Makes a new NaiveDateTime corresponding to a UTC date and time, from the number of non-leap seconds since the midnight UTC on January 1, 1970 (aka “UNIX timestamp”) and the number of nanoseconds since the last whole non-leap second.

For a non-naive version of this function see TimeZone::timestamp.

The nanosecond part can exceed 1,000,000,000 in order to represent the leap second. (The true “UNIX timestamp” cannot represent a leap second unambiguously.)

Panics on the out-of-range number of seconds and/or invalid nanosecond.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDateTime, NaiveDate};

let dt = NaiveDateTime::from_timestamp(0, 42_000_000);
assert_eq!(dt, NaiveDate::from_ymd(1970, 1, 1).and_hms_milli(0, 0, 0, 42));

let dt = NaiveDateTime::from_timestamp(1_000_000_000, 0);
assert_eq!(dt, NaiveDate::from_ymd(2001, 9, 9).and_hms(1, 46, 40));

Makes a new NaiveDateTime corresponding to a UTC date and time, from the number of non-leap seconds since the midnight UTC on January 1, 1970 (aka “UNIX timestamp”) and the number of nanoseconds since the last whole non-leap second.

The nanosecond part can exceed 1,000,000,000 in order to represent the leap second. (The true “UNIX timestamp” cannot represent a leap second unambiguously.)

Returns None on the out-of-range number of seconds and/or invalid nanosecond.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDateTime, NaiveDate};
use std::i64;

let from_timestamp_opt = NaiveDateTime::from_timestamp_opt;

assert!(from_timestamp_opt(0, 0).is_some());
assert!(from_timestamp_opt(0, 999_999_999).is_some());
assert!(from_timestamp_opt(0, 1_500_000_000).is_some()); // leap second
assert!(from_timestamp_opt(0, 2_000_000_000).is_none());
assert!(from_timestamp_opt(i64::MAX, 0).is_none());

Parses a string with the specified format string and returns a new NaiveDateTime. See the format::strftime module on the supported escape sequences.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDateTime, NaiveDate};

let parse_from_str = NaiveDateTime::parse_from_str;

assert_eq!(parse_from_str("2015-09-05 23:56:04", "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"),
           Ok(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 5).and_hms(23, 56, 4)));
assert_eq!(parse_from_str("5sep2015pm012345.6789", "%d%b%Y%p%I%M%S%.f"),
           Ok(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 5).and_hms_micro(13, 23, 45, 678_900)));

Offset is ignored for the purpose of parsing.

assert_eq!(parse_from_str("2014-5-17T12:34:56+09:30", "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%z"),
           Ok(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2014, 5, 17).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));

Leap seconds are correctly handled by treating any time of the form hh:mm:60 as a leap second. (This equally applies to the formatting, so the round trip is possible.)

assert_eq!(parse_from_str("2015-07-01 08:59:60.123", "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S%.f"),
           Ok(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 7, 1).and_hms_milli(8, 59, 59, 1_123)));

Missing seconds are assumed to be zero, but out-of-bound times or insufficient fields are errors otherwise.

assert_eq!(parse_from_str("94/9/4 7:15", "%y/%m/%d %H:%M"),
           Ok(NaiveDate::from_ymd(1994, 9, 4).and_hms(7, 15, 0)));

assert!(parse_from_str("04m33s", "%Mm%Ss").is_err());
assert!(parse_from_str("94/9/4 12", "%y/%m/%d %H").is_err());
assert!(parse_from_str("94/9/4 17:60", "%y/%m/%d %H:%M").is_err());
assert!(parse_from_str("94/9/4 24:00:00", "%y/%m/%d %H:%M:%S").is_err());

All parsed fields should be consistent to each other, otherwise it’s an error.

let fmt = "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S = UNIX timestamp %s";
assert!(parse_from_str("2001-09-09 01:46:39 = UNIX timestamp 999999999", fmt).is_ok());
assert!(parse_from_str("1970-01-01 00:00:00 = UNIX timestamp 1", fmt).is_err());

Retrieves a date component.

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 7, 8).and_hms(9, 10, 11);
assert_eq!(dt.date(), NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 7, 8));

Retrieves a time component.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveTime};

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 7, 8).and_hms(9, 10, 11);
assert_eq!(dt.time(), NaiveTime::from_hms(9, 10, 11));

Returns the number of non-leap seconds since the midnight on January 1, 1970.

Note that this does not account for the timezone! The true “UNIX timestamp” would count seconds since the midnight UTC on the epoch.

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(1970, 1, 1).and_hms_milli(0, 0, 1, 980);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp(), 1);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2001, 9, 9).and_hms(1, 46, 40);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp(), 1_000_000_000);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(1969, 12, 31).and_hms(23, 59, 59);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp(), -1);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(-1, 1, 1).and_hms(0, 0, 0);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp(), -62198755200);

Returns the number of non-leap milliseconds since midnight on January 1, 1970.

Note that this does not account for the timezone! The true “UNIX timestamp” would count seconds since the midnight UTC on the epoch.

Note also that this does reduce the number of years that can be represented from ~584 Billion to ~584 Million. (If this is a problem, please file an issue to let me know what domain needs millisecond precision over billions of years, I’m curious.)

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(1970, 1, 1).and_hms_milli(0, 0, 1, 444);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_millis(), 1_444);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2001, 9, 9).and_hms_milli(1, 46, 40, 555);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_millis(), 1_000_000_000_555);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(1969, 12, 31).and_hms_milli(23, 59, 59, 100);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_millis(), -900);

Returns the number of non-leap microseconds since midnight on January 1, 1970.

Note that this does not account for the timezone! The true “UNIX timestamp” would count seconds since the midnight UTC on the epoch.

Note also that this does reduce the number of years that can be represented from ~584 Billion to ~584 Thousand. (If this is a problem, please file an issue to let me know what domain needs microsecond precision over millennia, I’m curious.)

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(1970, 1, 1).and_hms_micro(0, 0, 1, 444);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_micros(), 1_000_444);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2001, 9, 9).and_hms_micro(1, 46, 40, 555);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_micros(), 1_000_000_000_000_555);

Returns the number of non-leap nanoseconds since midnight on January 1, 1970.

Note that this does not account for the timezone! The true “UNIX timestamp” would count seconds since the midnight UTC on the epoch.

Panics

Note also that this does reduce the number of years that can be represented from ~584 Billion to ~584 years. The dates that can be represented as nanoseconds are between 1677-09-21T00:12:44.0 and 2262-04-11T23:47:16.854775804.

(If this is a problem, please file an issue to let me know what domain needs nanosecond precision over millennia, I’m curious.)

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime};

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(1970, 1, 1).and_hms_nano(0, 0, 1, 444);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_nanos(), 1_000_000_444);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2001, 9, 9).and_hms_nano(1, 46, 40, 555);

const A_BILLION: i64 = 1_000_000_000;
let nanos = dt.timestamp_nanos();
assert_eq!(nanos, 1_000_000_000_000_000_555);
assert_eq!(
    dt,
    NaiveDateTime::from_timestamp(nanos / A_BILLION, (nanos % A_BILLION) as u32)
);

Returns the number of milliseconds since the last whole non-leap second.

The return value ranges from 0 to 999, or for leap seconds, to 1,999.

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 7, 8).and_hms_nano(9, 10, 11, 123_456_789);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_subsec_millis(), 123);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 7, 1).and_hms_nano(8, 59, 59, 1_234_567_890);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_subsec_millis(), 1_234);

Returns the number of microseconds since the last whole non-leap second.

The return value ranges from 0 to 999,999, or for leap seconds, to 1,999,999.

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 7, 8).and_hms_nano(9, 10, 11, 123_456_789);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_subsec_micros(), 123_456);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 7, 1).and_hms_nano(8, 59, 59, 1_234_567_890);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_subsec_micros(), 1_234_567);

Returns the number of nanoseconds since the last whole non-leap second.

The return value ranges from 0 to 999,999,999, or for leap seconds, to 1,999,999,999.

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 7, 8).and_hms_nano(9, 10, 11, 123_456_789);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_subsec_nanos(), 123_456_789);

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 7, 1).and_hms_nano(8, 59, 59, 1_234_567_890);
assert_eq!(dt.timestamp_subsec_nanos(), 1_234_567_890);

Adds given Duration to the current date and time.

As a part of Chrono’s leap second handling, the addition assumes that there is no leap second ever, except when the NaiveDateTime itself represents a leap second in which case the assumption becomes that there is exactly a single leap second ever.

Returns None when it will result in overflow.

Example
use chrono::{Duration, NaiveDate};

let from_ymd = NaiveDate::from_ymd;

let d = from_ymd(2016, 7, 8);
let hms = |h, m, s| d.and_hms(h, m, s);
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_add_signed(Duration::zero()),
           Some(hms(3, 5, 7)));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_add_signed(Duration::seconds(1)),
           Some(hms(3, 5, 8)));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_add_signed(Duration::seconds(-1)),
           Some(hms(3, 5, 6)));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_add_signed(Duration::seconds(3600 + 60)),
           Some(hms(4, 6, 7)));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_add_signed(Duration::seconds(86_400)),
           Some(from_ymd(2016, 7, 9).and_hms(3, 5, 7)));

let hmsm = |h, m, s, milli| d.and_hms_milli(h, m, s, milli);
assert_eq!(hmsm(3, 5, 7, 980).checked_add_signed(Duration::milliseconds(450)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 8, 430)));

Overflow returns None.

assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_add_signed(Duration::days(1_000_000_000)), None);

Leap seconds are handled, but the addition assumes that it is the only leap second happened.

let leap = hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_300);
assert_eq!(leap.checked_add_signed(Duration::zero()),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_300)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_add_signed(Duration::milliseconds(-500)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 59, 800)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_add_signed(Duration::milliseconds(500)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_800)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_add_signed(Duration::milliseconds(800)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 6, 0, 100)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_add_signed(Duration::seconds(10)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 6, 9, 300)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_add_signed(Duration::seconds(-10)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 50, 300)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_add_signed(Duration::days(1)),
           Some(from_ymd(2016, 7, 9).and_hms_milli(3, 5, 59, 300)));

Subtracts given Duration from the current date and time.

As a part of Chrono’s leap second handling, the subtraction assumes that there is no leap second ever, except when the NaiveDateTime itself represents a leap second in which case the assumption becomes that there is exactly a single leap second ever.

Returns None when it will result in overflow.

Example
use chrono::{Duration, NaiveDate};

let from_ymd = NaiveDate::from_ymd;

let d = from_ymd(2016, 7, 8);
let hms = |h, m, s| d.and_hms(h, m, s);
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_sub_signed(Duration::zero()),
           Some(hms(3, 5, 7)));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_sub_signed(Duration::seconds(1)),
           Some(hms(3, 5, 6)));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_sub_signed(Duration::seconds(-1)),
           Some(hms(3, 5, 8)));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_sub_signed(Duration::seconds(3600 + 60)),
           Some(hms(2, 4, 7)));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_sub_signed(Duration::seconds(86_400)),
           Some(from_ymd(2016, 7, 7).and_hms(3, 5, 7)));

let hmsm = |h, m, s, milli| d.and_hms_milli(h, m, s, milli);
assert_eq!(hmsm(3, 5, 7, 450).checked_sub_signed(Duration::milliseconds(670)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 6, 780)));

Overflow returns None.

assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7).checked_sub_signed(Duration::days(1_000_000_000)), None);

Leap seconds are handled, but the subtraction assumes that it is the only leap second happened.

let leap = hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_300);
assert_eq!(leap.checked_sub_signed(Duration::zero()),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_300)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_sub_signed(Duration::milliseconds(200)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_100)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_sub_signed(Duration::milliseconds(500)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 59, 800)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_sub_signed(Duration::seconds(60)),
           Some(hmsm(3, 5, 0, 300)));
assert_eq!(leap.checked_sub_signed(Duration::days(1)),
           Some(from_ymd(2016, 7, 7).and_hms_milli(3, 6, 0, 300)));

Subtracts another NaiveDateTime from the current date and time. This does not overflow or underflow at all.

As a part of Chrono’s leap second handling, the subtraction assumes that there is no leap second ever, except when any of the NaiveDateTimes themselves represents a leap second in which case the assumption becomes that there are exactly one (or two) leap second(s) ever.

Example
use chrono::{Duration, NaiveDate};

let from_ymd = NaiveDate::from_ymd;

let d = from_ymd(2016, 7, 8);
assert_eq!(d.and_hms(3, 5, 7).signed_duration_since(d.and_hms(2, 4, 6)),
           Duration::seconds(3600 + 60 + 1));

// July 8 is 190th day in the year 2016
let d0 = from_ymd(2016, 1, 1);
assert_eq!(d.and_hms_milli(0, 7, 6, 500).signed_duration_since(d0.and_hms(0, 0, 0)),
           Duration::seconds(189 * 86_400 + 7 * 60 + 6) + Duration::milliseconds(500));

Leap seconds are handled, but the subtraction assumes that there were no other leap seconds happened.

let leap = from_ymd(2015, 6, 30).and_hms_milli(23, 59, 59, 1_500);
assert_eq!(leap.signed_duration_since(from_ymd(2015, 6, 30).and_hms(23, 0, 0)),
           Duration::seconds(3600) + Duration::milliseconds(500));
assert_eq!(from_ymd(2015, 7, 1).and_hms(1, 0, 0).signed_duration_since(leap),
           Duration::seconds(3600) - Duration::milliseconds(500));

Formats the combined date and time with the specified formatting items. Otherwise it is the same as the ordinary format method.

The Iterator of items should be Cloneable, since the resulting DelayedFormat value may be formatted multiple times.

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;
use chrono::format::strftime::StrftimeItems;

let fmt = StrftimeItems::new("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S");
let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 5).and_hms(23, 56, 4);
assert_eq!(dt.format_with_items(fmt.clone()).to_string(), "2015-09-05 23:56:04");
assert_eq!(dt.format("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S").to_string(),    "2015-09-05 23:56:04");

The resulting DelayedFormat can be formatted directly via the Display trait.

assert_eq!(format!("{}", dt.format_with_items(fmt)), "2015-09-05 23:56:04");

Formats the combined date and time with the specified format string. See the format::strftime module on the supported escape sequences.

This returns a DelayedFormat, which gets converted to a string only when actual formatting happens. You may use the to_string method to get a String, or just feed it into print! and other formatting macros. (In this way it avoids the redundant memory allocation.)

A wrong format string does not issue an error immediately. Rather, converting or formatting the DelayedFormat fails. You are recommended to immediately use DelayedFormat for this reason.

Example
use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 5).and_hms(23, 56, 4);
assert_eq!(dt.format("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S").to_string(), "2015-09-05 23:56:04");
assert_eq!(dt.format("around %l %p on %b %-d").to_string(), "around 11 PM on Sep 5");

The resulting DelayedFormat can be formatted directly via the Display trait.

assert_eq!(format!("{}", dt.format("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")), "2015-09-05 23:56:04");
assert_eq!(format!("{}", dt.format("around %l %p on %b %-d")), "around 11 PM on Sep 5");

Converts the NaiveDateTime into the timezone-aware DateTime<Tz> with the provided timezone, if possible.

This can fail in cases where the local time represented by the NaiveDateTime is not a valid local timestamp in the target timezone due to an offset transition for example if the target timezone had a change from +00:00 to +01:00 occuring at 2015-09-05 22:59:59, then a local time of 2015-09-05 23:56:04 could never occur. Similarly, if the offset transitioned in the opposite direction then there would be two local times of 2015-09-05 23:56:04, one at +00:00 and one at +01:00.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, Utc};
let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 5).and_hms(23, 56, 4).and_local_timezone(Utc).unwrap();
assert_eq!(dt.timezone(), Utc);

The minimum possible NaiveDateTime.

The maximum possible NaiveDateTime.

Trait Implementations

An addition of Duration to NaiveDateTime yields another NaiveDateTime.

As a part of Chrono’s leap second handling, the addition assumes that there is no leap second ever, except when the NaiveDateTime itself represents a leap second in which case the assumption becomes that there is exactly a single leap second ever.

Panics on underflow or overflow. Use NaiveDateTime::checked_add_signed to detect that.

Example

use chrono::{Duration, NaiveDate};

let from_ymd = NaiveDate::from_ymd;

let d = from_ymd(2016, 7, 8);
let hms = |h, m, s| d.and_hms(h, m, s);
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) + Duration::zero(),             hms(3, 5, 7));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) + Duration::seconds(1),         hms(3, 5, 8));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) + Duration::seconds(-1),        hms(3, 5, 6));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) + Duration::seconds(3600 + 60), hms(4, 6, 7));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) + Duration::seconds(86_400),
           from_ymd(2016, 7, 9).and_hms(3, 5, 7));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) + Duration::days(365),
           from_ymd(2017, 7, 8).and_hms(3, 5, 7));

let hmsm = |h, m, s, milli| d.and_hms_milli(h, m, s, milli);
assert_eq!(hmsm(3, 5, 7, 980) + Duration::milliseconds(450), hmsm(3, 5, 8, 430));

Leap seconds are handled, but the addition assumes that it is the only leap second happened.

let leap = hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_300);
assert_eq!(leap + Duration::zero(),             hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_300));
assert_eq!(leap + Duration::milliseconds(-500), hmsm(3, 5, 59, 800));
assert_eq!(leap + Duration::milliseconds(500),  hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_800));
assert_eq!(leap + Duration::milliseconds(800),  hmsm(3, 6, 0, 100));
assert_eq!(leap + Duration::seconds(10),        hmsm(3, 6, 9, 300));
assert_eq!(leap + Duration::seconds(-10),       hmsm(3, 5, 50, 300));
assert_eq!(leap + Duration::days(1),
           from_ymd(2016, 7, 9).and_hms_milli(3, 5, 59, 300));
The resulting type after applying the + operator.
Performs the + operation. Read more
The resulting type after applying the + operator.
Performs the + operation. Read more
Performs the += operation. Read more
Returns a copy of the value. Read more
Performs copy-assignment from source. Read more

Returns the year number in the calendar date.

See also the NaiveDate::year method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.year(), 2015);

Returns the month number starting from 1.

The return value ranges from 1 to 12.

See also the NaiveDate::month method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.month(), 9);

Returns the month number starting from 0.

The return value ranges from 0 to 11.

See also the NaiveDate::month0 method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.month0(), 8);

Returns the day of month starting from 1.

The return value ranges from 1 to 31. (The last day of month differs by months.)

See also the NaiveDate::day method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.day(), 25);

Returns the day of month starting from 0.

The return value ranges from 0 to 30. (The last day of month differs by months.)

See also the NaiveDate::day0 method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.day0(), 24);

Returns the day of year starting from 1.

The return value ranges from 1 to 366. (The last day of year differs by years.)

See also the NaiveDate::ordinal method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.ordinal(), 268);

Returns the day of year starting from 0.

The return value ranges from 0 to 365. (The last day of year differs by years.)

See also the NaiveDate::ordinal0 method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.ordinal0(), 267);

Returns the day of week.

See also the NaiveDate::weekday method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike, Weekday};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.weekday(), Weekday::Fri);

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the year number changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveDate::with_year method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_year(2016), Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_year(-308), Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(-308, 9, 25).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the month number (starting from 1) changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveDate::with_month method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 30).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_month(10), Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 10, 30).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_month(13), None); // no month 13
assert_eq!(dt.with_month(2), None); // no February 30

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the month number (starting from 0) changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveDate::with_month0 method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 30).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_month0(9), Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 10, 30).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_month0(12), None); // no month 13
assert_eq!(dt.with_month0(1), None); // no February 30

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the day of month (starting from 1) changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveDate::with_day method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_day(30), Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 30).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_day(31), None); // no September 31

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the day of month (starting from 0) changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveDate::with_day0 method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_day0(29), Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 30).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_day0(30), None); // no September 31

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the day of year (starting from 1) changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveDate::with_ordinal method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_ordinal(60),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 3, 1).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_ordinal(366), None); // 2015 had only 365 days

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 9, 8).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_ordinal(60),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 2, 29).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_ordinal(366),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 12, 31).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the day of year (starting from 0) changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveDate::with_ordinal0 method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Datelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_ordinal0(59),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 3, 1).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_ordinal0(365), None); // 2015 had only 365 days

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 9, 8).and_hms(12, 34, 56);
assert_eq!(dt.with_ordinal0(59),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 2, 29).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_ordinal0(365),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 12, 31).and_hms(12, 34, 56)));
Returns the ISO week.
Returns the absolute year number starting from 1 with a boolean flag, which is false when the year predates the epoch (BCE/BC) and true otherwise (CE/AD). Read more
Counts the days in the proleptic Gregorian calendar, with January 1, Year 1 (CE) as day 1. Read more

The Debug output of the naive date and time dt is the same as dt.format("%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%.f").

The string printed can be readily parsed via the parse method on str.

It should be noted that, for leap seconds not on the minute boundary, it may print a representation not distinguishable from non-leap seconds. This doesn’t matter in practice, since such leap seconds never happened. (By the time of the first leap second on 1972-06-30, every time zone offset around the world has standardized to the 5-minute alignment.)

Example

use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 11, 15).and_hms(7, 39, 24);
assert_eq!(format!("{:?}", dt), "2016-11-15T07:39:24");

Leap seconds may also be used.

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 6, 30).and_hms_milli(23, 59, 59, 1_500);
assert_eq!(format!("{:?}", dt), "2015-06-30T23:59:60.500");
Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more

The default value for a NaiveDateTime is one with epoch 0 that is, 1st of January 1970 at 00:00:00.

Example

use chrono::NaiveDateTime;

let default_date = NaiveDateTime::default();
assert_eq!(default_date, NaiveDateTime::from_timestamp(0, 0));
Returns the “default value” for a type. Read more
Deserialize this value from the given Serde deserializer. Read more

The Display output of the naive date and time dt is the same as dt.format("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S%.f").

It should be noted that, for leap seconds not on the minute boundary, it may print a representation not distinguishable from non-leap seconds. This doesn’t matter in practice, since such leap seconds never happened. (By the time of the first leap second on 1972-06-30, every time zone offset around the world has standardized to the 5-minute alignment.)

Example

use chrono::NaiveDate;

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2016, 11, 15).and_hms(7, 39, 24);
assert_eq!(format!("{}", dt), "2016-11-15 07:39:24");

Leap seconds may also be used.

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 6, 30).and_hms_milli(23, 59, 59, 1_500);
assert_eq!(format!("{}", dt), "2015-06-30 23:59:60.500");
Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more
Error that can occur in rounding or truncating
Return a copy rounded by Duration. Read more
Return a copy truncated by Duration. Read more

Parsing a str into a NaiveDateTime uses the same format, %Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%.f, as in Debug.

Example

use chrono::{NaiveDateTime, NaiveDate};

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 18).and_hms(23, 56, 4);
assert_eq!("2015-09-18T23:56:04".parse::<NaiveDateTime>(), Ok(dt));

let dt = NaiveDate::from_ymd(12345, 6, 7).and_hms_milli(7, 59, 59, 1_500); // leap second
assert_eq!("+12345-6-7T7:59:60.5".parse::<NaiveDateTime>(), Ok(dt));

assert!("foo".parse::<NaiveDateTime>().is_err());
The associated error which can be returned from parsing.
Parses a string s to return a value of this type. Read more
Feeds this value into the given Hasher. Read more
Feeds a slice of this type into the given Hasher. Read more
This method returns an Ordering between self and other. Read more
Compares and returns the maximum of two values. Read more
Compares and returns the minimum of two values. Read more
Restrict a value to a certain interval. Read more
This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==. Read more
This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason. Read more
This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more

Serialize a NaiveDateTime as an RFC 3339 string

See the serde module for alternate serialization formats.

Serialize this value into the given Serde serializer. Read more

A subtraction of Duration from NaiveDateTime yields another NaiveDateTime. It is the same as the addition with a negated Duration.

As a part of Chrono’s leap second handling, the addition assumes that there is no leap second ever, except when the NaiveDateTime itself represents a leap second in which case the assumption becomes that there is exactly a single leap second ever.

Panics on underflow or overflow. Use NaiveDateTime::checked_sub_signed to detect that.

Example

use chrono::{Duration, NaiveDate};

let from_ymd = NaiveDate::from_ymd;

let d = from_ymd(2016, 7, 8);
let hms = |h, m, s| d.and_hms(h, m, s);
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) - Duration::zero(),             hms(3, 5, 7));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) - Duration::seconds(1),         hms(3, 5, 6));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) - Duration::seconds(-1),        hms(3, 5, 8));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) - Duration::seconds(3600 + 60), hms(2, 4, 7));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) - Duration::seconds(86_400),
           from_ymd(2016, 7, 7).and_hms(3, 5, 7));
assert_eq!(hms(3, 5, 7) - Duration::days(365),
           from_ymd(2015, 7, 9).and_hms(3, 5, 7));

let hmsm = |h, m, s, milli| d.and_hms_milli(h, m, s, milli);
assert_eq!(hmsm(3, 5, 7, 450) - Duration::milliseconds(670), hmsm(3, 5, 6, 780));

Leap seconds are handled, but the subtraction assumes that it is the only leap second happened.

let leap = hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_300);
assert_eq!(leap - Duration::zero(),            hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_300));
assert_eq!(leap - Duration::milliseconds(200), hmsm(3, 5, 59, 1_100));
assert_eq!(leap - Duration::milliseconds(500), hmsm(3, 5, 59, 800));
assert_eq!(leap - Duration::seconds(60),       hmsm(3, 5, 0, 300));
assert_eq!(leap - Duration::days(1),
           from_ymd(2016, 7, 7).and_hms_milli(3, 6, 0, 300));
The resulting type after applying the - operator.
Performs the - operation. Read more
The resulting type after applying the - operator.
Performs the - operation. Read more

Subtracts another NaiveDateTime from the current date and time. This does not overflow or underflow at all.

As a part of Chrono’s leap second handling, the subtraction assumes that there is no leap second ever, except when any of the NaiveDateTimes themselves represents a leap second in which case the assumption becomes that there are exactly one (or two) leap second(s) ever.

The implementation is a wrapper around NaiveDateTime::signed_duration_since.

Example

use chrono::{Duration, NaiveDate};

let from_ymd = NaiveDate::from_ymd;

let d = from_ymd(2016, 7, 8);
assert_eq!(d.and_hms(3, 5, 7) - d.and_hms(2, 4, 6), Duration::seconds(3600 + 60 + 1));

// July 8 is 190th day in the year 2016
let d0 = from_ymd(2016, 1, 1);
assert_eq!(d.and_hms_milli(0, 7, 6, 500) - d0.and_hms(0, 0, 0),
           Duration::seconds(189 * 86_400 + 7 * 60 + 6) + Duration::milliseconds(500));

Leap seconds are handled, but the subtraction assumes that no other leap seconds happened.

let leap = from_ymd(2015, 6, 30).and_hms_milli(23, 59, 59, 1_500);
assert_eq!(leap - from_ymd(2015, 6, 30).and_hms(23, 0, 0),
           Duration::seconds(3600) + Duration::milliseconds(500));
assert_eq!(from_ymd(2015, 7, 1).and_hms(1, 0, 0) - leap,
           Duration::seconds(3600) - Duration::milliseconds(500));
The resulting type after applying the - operator.
Performs the - operation. Read more
Performs the -= operation. Read more

Returns the hour number from 0 to 23.

See also the NaiveTime::hour method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Timelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);
assert_eq!(dt.hour(), 12);

Returns the minute number from 0 to 59.

See also the NaiveTime::minute method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Timelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);
assert_eq!(dt.minute(), 34);

Returns the second number from 0 to 59.

See also the NaiveTime::second method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Timelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);
assert_eq!(dt.second(), 56);

Returns the number of nanoseconds since the whole non-leap second. The range from 1,000,000,000 to 1,999,999,999 represents the leap second.

See also the NaiveTime::nanosecond method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Timelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);
assert_eq!(dt.nanosecond(), 789_000_000);

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the hour number changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveTime::with_hour method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Timelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);
assert_eq!(dt.with_hour(7),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(7, 34, 56, 789)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_hour(24), None);

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the minute number changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid.

See also the NaiveTime::with_minute method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Timelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);
assert_eq!(dt.with_minute(45),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 45, 56, 789)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_minute(60), None);

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with the second number changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid. As with the NaiveDateTime::second method, the input range is restricted to 0 through 59.

See also the NaiveTime::with_second method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Timelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);
assert_eq!(dt.with_second(17),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 17, 789)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_second(60), None);

Makes a new NaiveDateTime with nanoseconds since the whole non-leap second changed.

Returns None when the resulting NaiveDateTime would be invalid. As with the NaiveDateTime::nanosecond method, the input range can exceed 1,000,000,000 for leap seconds.

See also the NaiveTime::with_nanosecond method.

Example
use chrono::{NaiveDate, NaiveDateTime, Timelike};

let dt: NaiveDateTime = NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_milli(12, 34, 56, 789);
assert_eq!(dt.with_nanosecond(333_333_333),
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_nano(12, 34, 56, 333_333_333)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_nanosecond(1_333_333_333), // leap second
           Some(NaiveDate::from_ymd(2015, 9, 8).and_hms_nano(12, 34, 56, 1_333_333_333)));
assert_eq!(dt.with_nanosecond(2_000_000_000), None);
Returns the hour number from 1 to 12 with a boolean flag, which is false for AM and true for PM. Read more
Returns the number of non-leap seconds past the last midnight.

Auto Trait Implementations

Blanket Implementations

Gets the TypeId of self. Read more
Immutably borrows from an owned value. Read more
Mutably borrows from an owned value. Read more

Returns the argument unchanged.

Calls U::from(self).

That is, this conversion is whatever the implementation of From<T> for U chooses to do.

The resulting type after obtaining ownership.
Creates owned data from borrowed data, usually by cloning. Read more
Uses borrowed data to replace owned data, usually by cloning. Read more
Converts the given value to a String. Read more
The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
Performs the conversion.
The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
Performs the conversion.